Barnby Dun with Kirk Sandall Parish Council

Barnby Dun

In Barnby (Dun) Asulfr had 9 Bovates of land taxable. ½ plough possible there. Now Malger has (it) from William. He (has) ½ plough and 4 villagers and a small holder with 1 plough. There is a priest and a Church. From doomsday records no mention of parishioners but an educated estimate of 80 people lived in this settlement of 500 acres split into 3 Holdings or Manors.

The Church originally was built of wood. It burnt down and in the 13th century after the Black Death of 1348 / 52 when the population grew was decided to rebuild in stone. This building continued until after the 15th century and is more or less what we have today. A Church leader has always been here and from 1244 a record of incumbents can be seen within the Church. In 1925 the Diocese of Sheffield elected vicars as it is today. The ancient parish boundary was based on the tithe and enclosure awards and as today is linked to Thorpe in Balne and South Bramwith. In 1871 the population was 484 and it was a agricultural village. The canal was constructed here in 1732 for the benefit of industry and movement of farm produce between Hull ports, here, Doncaster and through to Sheffield. It was constructed here first because the river was not navigable at times due to being tidal and heavy silt deposits at times. Flood banks were also put in position to protect the village and later on secondary banks were built as the village is close to the flood plains. The railways came to the village in 1845 and that brought industry to the area and we were changing slowly from agricultural being the only form of work. Sidings were introduced to handle all the freight from the area. George Frederick Milnthorp a large landowner/farmer changed the brought prosperity to the village when in 1860 built his first maltkiln. This was malt dried turned and when ready added to beer etc. By 1907 he had built all three here in the village. This meant that the farm labourers could work all year, in the fields and then in the kilns in winter. In 1920 he sold land to Pilkington’s so that they could build the village of Kirk Sandall our parish neighbours. In 1943 his nephew continued with the business after George’s death until selling out to Tetley Brewery in 1964. The business still thrived until its closure in 1964. In 1905 Bentley pit was sunk. In 1911 Stainforth pit was sunk. In 1920 Pilkington’s glassworks and new dikes and drains were being dug at the turn of the century. People flooded in to this area claiming the right to work. It was a boom time for Barnby Dun and the near area. Small light industry appeared and complimented each other with more avenues of employment. In 1958 the river was re-routed to take the twists and bends out of it. In 1959 Thorpe Marsh Power Station was commissioned to be built, and became operational in 1963 bringing yet more employment to Barnby Dun. This has since closed down after 25 years of production leaving a blot on the landscape. Housing of 1921 and 1940 were the two boom times for new properties to be built for the industrial workers and later the post war boom. Private and council properties were being built at these times. More people brought families to Barnby Dun. Families with young children who needed education as we do today. Barnby Dun became a sought after area to live in and in the 1950’s and 60’s the village had yet again large increases in residential development mainly in the form of semi-detached bungalows and semi-detached houses to house the ever increasing population. This increase steadily continued through the 70’s mainly in the form of bungalows in the Pine Hall Road development and then rapidly progressed in the 80’s and 90’s with a mixture of larger detached bungalows and houses in the Meadowfield Estate. BARNBY DUN LOCATION: Five and half miles north east of Doncaster. NEAREST TOWNS: Doncaster, Thorne, Goole. SCHOOLS: Barnby Dun Primary, Church Road (Ages 4-11); Hungerhill School, Hungerhill Lane, Edenthorpe (Ages 11-16). CHURCHES: St Peters, Church Road; Methodist Chapel, High Street. LEISURE: Bowling Green, Barnby Dun Scout Group, Barnby Dun with Kirk Sandall Sports Association. AMENITIES: Playgroup, Mother and Toddlers in Barnby Dun Parish Hall

A Church leader has always been here and from 1244 a record of incumbents can be seen within the Church. In 1925 the Diocese of Sheffield elected vicars as it is today. The ancient parish boundary was based on the tithe and enclosure awards and as today is linked to Thorpe in Balne and South Bramwith. In 1871 the population was 484 and it was a agricultural village. The canal was constructed here in 1732 for the benefit of industry and movement of farm produce between Hull ports, here, Doncaster and through to Sheffield. It was constructed here first because the river was not navigable at times due to being tidal and heavy silt deposits at times. Flood banks were also put in position to protect the village and later on secondary banks were built as the village is close to the flood plains. The railways came to the village in 1845 and that brought industry to the area and we were changing slowly from agricultural being the only form of work. Sidings were introduced to handle all the freight from the area. George Frederick Milnthorp a large landowner/farmer changed the brought prosperity to the village when in 1860 built his first maltkiln. This was malt dried turned and when ready added to beer etc. By 1907 he had built all three here in the village. This meant that the farm labourers could work all year, in the fields and then in the kilns in winter. In 1920 he sold land to Pilkington’s so that they could build the village of Kirk Sandall our parish neighbours. In 1943 his nephew continued with the business after George’s death until selling out to Tetley Brewery in 1964. The business still thrived until its closure in 1964. In 1905 Bentley pit was sunk. In 1911 Stainforth pit was sunk. In 1920 Pilkington’s glassworks and new dikes and drains were being dug at the turn of the century. People flooded in to this area claiming the right to work. It was a boom time for Barnby Dun and the near area. Small light industry appeared and complimented each other with more avenues of employment. In 1958 the river was re-routed to take the twists and bends out of it. In 1959 Thorpe Marsh Power Station was commissioned to be built, and became operational in 1963 bringing yet more employment to Barnby Dun. This has since closed down after 25 years of production leaving a blot on the landscape. Housing of 1921 and 1940 were the two boom times for new properties to be built for the industrial workers and later the post war boom. Private and council properties were being built at these times. More people brought families to Barnby Dun. Families with young children who needed education as we do today. Barnby Dun became a sought after area to live in and in the 1950’s and 60’s the village had yet again large increases in residential development mainly in the form of semi-detached bungalows and semi-detached houses to house the ever increasing population. This increase steadily continued through the 70’s mainly in the form of bungalows in the Pine Hall Road development and then rapidly progressed in the 80’s and 90’s with a mixture of larger detached bungalows and houses in the Meadowfield Estate.

BARNBY DUN

LOCATION: Five and half miles north east of Doncaster.

NEAREST TOWNS: Doncaster, Thorne, Goole

SCHOOLS:

Barnby Dun Primary, Church Road (Ages 4-11);

Hungerhill School, Hungerhill Lane, Edenthorpe (Ages 11-16).

CHURCHES: St Peters, Church Road; Methodist Chapel, High Street.

LEISURE:

Bowling Green, Barnby Dun Scout Group, Barnby Dun with Kirk Sandall Sports Association.

AMENITIES:

Playgroup, Mother and Toddlers in Barnby Dun Parish Hall